Skip to main content

About your Search

20100701
20100731
SHOW
Today 83
( more )
STATION
FOXNEWS 585
MSNBC 377
CNN 374
CSPAN 236
WJLA (ABC) 226
WMAR (ABC) 216
WUSA (CBS) 207
WRC (NBC) 200
WBAL (NBC) 189
WTTG 151
KGO (ABC) 146
SFGTV2 144
WJZ (CBS) 137
WETA 135
WHUT (Howard University Television) 129
KQED (PBS) 96
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 4171
Spanish 36
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 4,224 (some duplicates have been removed)
's certainly true that many people want to come here. why? what is great about america? >> fox t-shirts? our ability to make money? great stuff here. fox coffee mugs? america is a society built on entrepreneurship. >> i found in england there is 10 reasons you could do something, there was 20 reasons why you couldn't do it. >> many people hate our military. but others say it's one of the things that makes us great. >> every other country in the history of the world when it's history we rebuilt japan. >> when it comes to charity, americans give more than anyone, so why does he say? >> it is the crumbs off our table that we offer these countries. >> to be a black man -- >> -- race is a big problem, right? >> that is controlled by rich white people. >> or could the way america has handled race actually be something to be proud of? >> show me a racism today that is strong enough to prevent you and me from achieving the american dream. show it to me. >> no more hate speech on our campus. >> in canada, ann coulter was told she could not speak but in america we speak truth to power. >> you work for
. why? what is great about america? >> fox t-shirts? our ability to make money? great stuff here. fox coffee mugs? america is a society built on entrepreneurship. >> i found in england there is 10 reasons you could do something, there was 20 reasons why you couldn't do it. >> many people hate our military. but others say it's one of the things that makes us great. >> every other country in the history of the world when it's history we rebuilt japan. >> when it comes to charity, americans give more than anyone, so why does he say? >> it is the crumbs off our table that we offer these countries. >> to be a black man -- >> -- race is a big problem, right? >> that is controlled by rich white people. >> or could the way america has handled race actually be something to be proud of? >> show me a racism today that is strong enough to prevent you and me from achieving the american dream. show it to me. >> no more hate speech on our campus. >> in canada, ann coulter was told she could not speak but in america we speak truth to power. >> you work for us. >> isn't that great about america? >> no
people want to come here. why? what is great about america? >> fox t-shirts? our ability to make money? great stuff here. fox coffee mugs? america is a society built on entrepreneurship. >> i found in england there is 10 reasons you could do something, there was 20 reasons why you couldn't do it. >> many people hate our military. but others say it's one of the things that makes us great. >> every other country in the history of the world when it's history we rebuilt japan. >> when it comes to charity, americans give more than anyone, so why does he say? >> it is the crumbs off our table that we offer these countries. >> to be a black man -- >> -- race is a big problem, right? >> that is controlled by rich white people. >> or could the way america has handled race actually be something to be proud of? >> show me a racism today that is strong enough to prevent you and me from achieving the american dream. show it to me. >> no more hate speech on our campus. >> in canada, ann coulter was told she could not speak but in america we speak truth to power. >> you work for us. >> isn't that gre
have a great fourth. >> and now, what's great about america with john stossel. >> john: america, has a race problem. a history of slavery, then jim crowe then segregation. even now many instances of racial hatred. it's a reason some people say america is anything but great. [shouting] >> america has had plenty of racial conflict. >> looters and arsonists took to the streets. >> john: hundreds of americans have been killed in race riots. and even now many people say the election of a first black president changed little. >> race relations have not improved as much as in the united states as a lot of people hoped they would. >> think about what america was like. >> i say segregation now, segregation tomorrow, and segregation forever. >> it's true that blacks have suffered a special fate in america. no other group was enslaved, no other group had jim crow laws of segregation directed against it no society has done more to combat that legacy. >> john: today actually, other nations may have more race-based violence. in france, charges of discrimination against dark skinned immigrants
. >> tonight we ask the question, what's great about america? >> there's opportunities here. >> anything is possible. >> it's the best place on earth. >> it's true many people want to come here. why? what is great about america? >> our ability to make money? >> great stuff here. >> coffee mugs? >> america is a society built on entrepreneur ship. >> i found in england if there are 10 reasons you could do something there were 20 reasons you couldn't do it. >> many people hate our military but others say it's one of the things that makes us great. >> every country when it defeated an adversary they hav an adversary. we went and rebuilt japjapan. >> americans give more than anybody. >> why does he say? >> it's the crumbs off off our e we offer these countries. >> racism a problem, right? >> that is control the rich white people. >> could the way america handles race actually be something to be proud of. >> show me a racism today that is strong enough to prevent you or me from achieving the american dream. show it to me. (chanting) >> in canada ann coulter was told she could not speak but in
democracy in america. in 1840 he wrote in his book, you know, america's a strange place when it comes to the courts. sooner or later every major case in america ends up in the courtroom. the american legal system, the torte system is so engrained in america. these alternatives, creative as they may be, as useful and effective as they may be at the margins, at the margins, i think. >> we'll take one last question. >> i'm from thailand. two questions. one is for american government. now $20 billion is not enough for the disaster. so what do you think the american government will do next? one. the second is i know president obama is very angry about the disaster. so do you think that this disaster issue will have a bad influence on the relationship between america and england? thank you. >> the american government will never contribute to this bp claims facility. bp has agreed to shoulder the cost of the facility and it is said if $20 billion is not enough, and i reserve on that question, bp says they will replenish the fund. this is a bp obligation. admitted by bp. we agree. wh
♪ [ male announcer ] this is america. and this is our cheese. kraft singles. american cheese. only one nation could create it. and that nation is...america. ♪ ♪ kraft singles. the american cheese. [ fele announcer ] this is a strawberry pop tart. but this is warm, fresh-baked strawberry toaster strudel [ music ] see the difference? pillsbury toaster strudel, the one kids want to eat. swimming is my favorite thing. ♪ ♪ and only two things can get me out of the water. prunedoes... ♪ ♪ and totino's. ♪ we're the kids in america ♪ gñgñgñgñgñgñgño;o;yñyñyñyñyñyñyñpp@ú@ú@ú@ú@ñ@ñ@ñ@ñ@ñ@ñ@ñ@ñ@ñ@ñ t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t
>> thank you for joining us. a somewhat better program than "this is america" could we bring together a group of important and influential guests to try to define what it means to be an american? our guests include supreme court associate justice, scalia. yale law school professor, kenji yoshino, a syndicated newspaper columnist, john podesta, president of the center for american progress, the president of the national council of la raza and the president of the national education association. american identity and the american experience, next. "this is america." "this is america" is brought to you by hyundai motor america-- maker of the 2007 sonata. the national education association, the nation's largest advocate for children and public education. the city of paducah, kentucky -- located in mccracken county, home of the artist relocation program. the rotondaro family trust, the ctc foundation, and the american life tv network. >> as we begin the festivities tonight, thank you all for joining in on this incredibly this -- incredibly exciting topic of trying to decide what i
are very, very important to the make it in america agenda, incurred to manufacturing in any way we can. we have to do that to the education component you spoke of earlier so we have the kind of technically scientifically, mathematically and engineering trained people to take the kinds of jobs that will expand manufacturing. we believe, with the national association of manufacturers, that america is the best place. we have the best resources in our people. given the proper environment, we will be able to compete with anybody in the world. i want to say that you can take the message back to the national association of manufacturers that i personally, and members of the democratic caucus, look forward to working with the national association of manufacturers toward our joint objectives. we do not always agree. nobody would expect that. but i think on this objective of creating jobs and making sure that the rest of the world knows that we can and do make it in america, america will be a greater economy and our people will be better off. thank you all very much. [applause] [captioning performed
today to this very special day. we are very excited that virgin america, which less than three years ago was just an idea, continues to expand and grow and really set a foot in the bay area. it has really grown from that small footprint just three years ago. the growth is possible because of the partnership between the airport and a lot of people and organizations, and one of the great organizations we partner with is the san francisco commission of business bureau. it is my pleasure to introduce the director. >> thank you and good morning. what a great day this is. i would like to recognize charlotte schulz on the podium. it is always great to see you. great audience for a great day to start a new service. it was three years ago on august 7 that virgin america first took off out of san francisco and really changed the airline industry in this country. it is the only airline based in san francisco, which is something we are very proud of. the only airline based in california, as a matter of fact. once they have done since they started three years ago has changed the way people fly, makin
pioneers. our heroes. our parents. our selves. le coming to america, to a country who did not understand who we were, what we have done, and what we do, would do in this land of opportunity. it is this older generation that paved the way to make this country our own. from coast to coast we've built our communities, raised our families, fought injustice and stood stronger than whatever tried to bring us down. it is the community spirit that beats in the heart of every filipino and it is in communities where fill in -- filipinos find their strength and celebrate their triumphs. fill i inoes across the country joined the charge for progress, for change, hope, and helped elect america's first black president, bronalt they are the kind of person who generously shares their heard-earned delarkss extends a helping hand, puts together needed goods to send aid back home. it is a success story of business leaders, athletes, artists and others who use their talents to help advance other fill i inoes. it is the flame of democracy rekindled through the burning legacy of the common desire for freedom.
here, america? i have an answer, you may not like it. but tonight and tomorrow on this program you are going to see things that i think make way too much sense. the radical mines who have been working to change america from what it was into what you are no seeing, how they're doing it. it is time to go back in time to be able to see the future. it's time to tell the story of the new america. hello, america. i'm glad you're here. i want to say right upfront i'm proud to be an american. i want to get that off my chest because i don't think you hear that. you have not heard that radical words on television. last i checked, america is the last beacon of hope in the world. people are not risk their lives through swim through shark infested waters to start a new wife in france, are they? they come here, to the land of opportunity, the land of the free, home of the brave. i don't hear much talk about the great promise of america or what used to be called "the genius" of america. i hear talk of how the police act stupidly in massachusetts. they are about to be racist in arizona. i hear of
: hello, america. welcome to the "glenn beck program." i hope you are enjoying your independence day. and all of the celebrations that go along with it. this is the summer of restoration, and we've been doing our best to try to keep a true history of america and trying to keep it from being erased, or just being written over. i got the idea in april to do something on this show called "founders fridays." i want to tell the stories, the real stories of our founders that have been lost. and let america fall in love with their stories again. the way i have. i love george washington. if you want to restore something, you have to first know how it was made. it's now july. and founder's friday are going strong. they're some of the highest rated shows ever. it shows that millions have a hunger for the truth. and so tonight we're going to devote another hour of history with a look back at some of the highlights from our "founders' fridays." grab a pen, piece of paper and grab your kids and join us as we continue tonight to restore history and restore america. let me tell you how this all sta
at home and around the world. sit tight "this is america." >> "this is america is brought to you by -- hyundai motor america, maker of the 2009 sonata. the national educational association, the nation's largest advocate for children and public education. the rotundaro family trust. the c.t.c. foundation. and the american life tv network. dennis: all right. everyone, let's loosen up, relax here and give it a go here. the country's in a horrible financial mess right now. it has been battered. it seems to suggest already that we're at some kind a cross roads. do you think so? are we at a cross roads in the country where we can either go back and try to fix things or we can kind of retool for the future? >> i left for japan in the last week of september, we didn't have a financial crisis. i came back a few weeks later, we did. so this has moved very fast. i think it's a great opportunity for our country to apply the things we've been talking about in the council competitiveness. being more competitive, compete on the world stage, don't retreat but go out and compete as a country. den
specific details on how the white house plans to address america's immigration problem. there were several factual errors in the speech the president misquoted an engraving on statute of the liberty and the date the statue was assembled. looks like the fact-checkers at the white house went on their break a little early before that speech. now i'm joined by steve moore and from abc news, rick klein, both great friends of mine. thank you for joining me guys. steve you are joining us from michigan tonight which has a third .6 unemployment rate. 1 -- has a 13.6 unemployment rate. steve, after the democrats passed the stimulus plan in february of 2009 they promised unemployment would not go above 8%, michigan 13.6%. what is the democrats' plan b? >> there is no plan b. when you talk about the president's arrival rating so much4 is related to the failure of the big trillion dollar fiscal stimulus bill that passed last february. americans are asking everywhere i go, i'm sure they ask you the same question, where are the jobs? the president promised three million jobs, we lost two million. discou
this week. my next guest says double dip recession, here we can. craig smith of swiss america. are you saying flat out, here comes another recession? >> absolutely. no mistake about it, we're heading in the wrong direction. all i have to do is look at the bond rates. we're below 3%, corporate balance sheets are stuffed with cash. they see a slowdown. the consumers deleveraging, unemployment is high. how in the world can this president say we're headed the right detection? if you look at the data, we're headed for a double dip. >> i'm not putting words into the president's mouth but he could point to the 600,000 new private sector jobs created in the last six months. that is a step in the right direction. >> well, stuart, but -- i'm suspect of those numbers to begin with. you know, this president wants to create or save or -- i mean the jargon is getting ridiculous. look at the data. if you look at manufacturing numbers, it dropped 1.4%, consumer confidence, 8% of the people think business is good. 4% believe jobs are plentiful. there's no confidence out there. i'm a business owner. i h
and around the world. sit tight. "this is america." "this is america" is made possible by hyundai motor -- maker of the 2009 sonata. association, the nation's largest advocate for children and public education. the -- family trust. ctc foundation. and the american life tv network. >> all right, everyone, let us loosen up and relax and give it a go. the country is in a horrible financial mess right now. the image of the country abroad has been battered. it seemed to suggest already we are at some kind of a crossroads. do you think so, chad? are we at a crossroads where we can go and try to go back and fix things or tried to retool for the future. >> when i left for japan the last week of september we did not have a financial crisis and when i came back a few weeks later, we did. this has moved very fast. i think it is a great opportunity for our country to apply the things we have talked about in the council of competitiveness, compete on the world stage, don't retreat into our show will go out and compete with the great intellect have in our country. >> debra, weigh in here now. talking
, next. "this is america. "this is america" is made possible by hyundai motor america, maker of the 2007 sonata. the national education association, the nation's largest advocate for children and public education. the city of paducah, kentucky, located in mccracken county, home of the paducah artist relocation program. the rotondaro family trust. the ctc foundation. and the american life tv network. what do you think is american's greatest value, and what do you think are our greatest shortcomings and failures. go ahead. >> this was predicted by took bell -- by the total bill. at one of the consequences of democracy is the leveling down of culture, and i think he was right. >> is that a nice way of saying it, "leveling down? >> i think that is right. i think is inevitable. >> i see more integration occurring now than i think -- without a lot of assistance from anybody else. before the turn of the century we had a huge wave of immigrants coming through. we had all sorts of systems had set up to help integrate people into this country. now you have got folks who are trying to assimilate, t
has a much talked about documentary about south america called "itself of the border." there is more on the way this month. also tonight, a preview of the next installment of teak -- tavis smiley reports. we will look at the plight of orleans. a unique look at the people of new orleans, shot on location in conjunction with an oscar winning film maker. we're glad that you have joined us. >> all that i know is that his name is jane. -- james. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you helpless all to make life better. >> nationwide insurance it supports tavis smiley. we are proud to join him in improving financial literacy and conomic empowerment. nationwide is on your side. >> and for contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> we are pleased to welcome oliver stone back to this program. this year he is releasing his sequel to "on wall street." before that you can see his documentary, "south of the border." focusing on the political movements and culture of south of the border. >> they also mobilized support within military help, getting
it will fail again? why is he still trying? ♪ ♪ >> glenn: hello, america, sometimes i think i should own stock in a company that makes duct tape so i could just wrap my head in duct tape. because every time i see the news i think my head is going to explode. sure, it won't stop my head from exploding, i don't think anything will, but at least when i get to the hospital, i'll have all the pieces in the duct tape. our karl marx loving administration is trying to spend our way out of this debt crisis. debt works for only so long. we're about to send progressive supreme court member in to unleash right there on the constitution. remember, progressives think the constitution is outdated. it's an old document. then there are stories also in the news, like this one out of arlington high school in massachusetts. an opportunity there named sean harrington noticed something odd when he started going to class, there were no flags in the classroom. nobody ever said the pledge of allegiance. well, sean decided to get the flags and put them in the class room to have the students recite pledge of allegiance
much work in america being shipped overseas and it is a problem. something that congress and president obama need to look at. i agree. host: our topic, small businesses in the obama administration. our guests, lloyd chapman, thank you for being with us. guest: thank you for -- thank you very much. host: in a moment we will take you to the floor of the u.s. house of representatives. by the way, the senate judiciary committee is holding another hearing on the fbi. robert mullen will be among those testifying. the debt commission is holding its first public hearing -- fourth public hearing with alan simpson, coverage online at c- span.org. thank you for being with us on this wednesday. we will take you to the floor of the house, enjoy the rest of your day. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] . the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., july 28, 2010. i hereby appoint the honorable ed pastor
if that is still allowed in america. this cannot be visceral. we can't lump everyone together. if that's what you like to do, you should turn the show off. if you are willing to listen in context and try to figure out what the heck is happening in your country, then join me. tonight we're going to tell the mostly unknown and most people avoid this part of it. the story of america. c'mon! ♪ ♪ >> glenn: you know what? i have faith in america. i have faith in americans. i have never treated you as an audience member as a moron. i have haven't. the day i start treating you like a moron or stop telling you what i really believe because it's too politically costly, i think we will be losing the republic. we have to be measured and reasonable when we say it. i have taken a lot of hits from people like reverend jim wallace on social justice. i spoke my mind on social justice, because i needed you to know there was a poison in many of your churches. this poison is explained social justice the way june wallace or jeremiah wallace understands it. it's not in the gospel. redistribution of wealth is not i
an unrelenting focus on america's struggling workers. we look forward to hearing his thought about the right course to take. please come and join me in welcoming steny hoyer. [applause] >> thank you very much. i am always pleased to be here. i am particularly pleased to be here facilitated by the action fund. thank you very much. i had the opportunity to speak before we came in. i am always pleased to be here with my good in here from martin frost. thank you for being here. america has faced its share of trials, at times when not as our economy but our nation seemed in decline. each time with ingenuity, hard work, and are distinctly american optimism, we have built our way out and we have to emerge stronger. no one doubts this as one of those tested times. the question will be in front of us is not where we are. it is where we go from here. it is a choice between too dramatically different direction. our decision comes down to three questions, how far we have come, what remains to be done, and which party and will keep moving us forward? first, how far have we come? but consider an alternate
someone, he's not a lose are. >> neil: you're terrific. >>> hello, america. i want you to remember a phrase as we get started here tonight. that is "divide and conquer." late yesterday, the naacp passed a resolution we told you about condemning the tea party movement for tolerating bigotry. look at the bigots. look at the hate mongers. i don't want to belong to a racist organization. do you? no! so let's make sure, let's make sure they're painted as racists. they're doing this. it's the political agenda. look at how we're being divided here. financial reform, if you're for it, you're proreform. if not, you're with the robber barons, the wall street fat cats. that's what you are. healthcare reform, kids are going to go to heaven. they'll have a great happy life. there won't be any disease. or you just want babies to die in the streets. look how we're being divided. immigration, you're prodiversity or you hate people different than you. cap-and-trade, you love the earth. you're against it? you hate the earth. why do you want to destroy our children's future? what is this? what is thi
founders wished. whether you wish to accept it or not, america, right now, is being presented with a choice: are we going to be based on the idea of liberty and individual freedom? or all we all socialists now? which ideals is the question you have to ask yourself in the next three days, which ideals do the actions of this administration more closely resemble? do they resemble redistribution of wealth? globalism? marxism? or the ideals of individual liberty. personal responsibility. free market. and the freedom to succeed or fail. which one? now, use this and we will come back to it. i need you to use this along with your reason and common sense. some things are not provable. god is not provable. but can we prove beyond a reasonable doubt? you are going to have to make that choice. i ask you now to set your dvr and record this show the next three nights and pass it on with your friends. i believe this is important for you to decide. this is a three-day journey we will be on. in the end, you have to decide. which one? your choice. we begin now. hello, america. you can call any time. all righ
and innovation. it's about making things in america again. right now, at an office building outside of washington, d.c., over a million patent applications sit gathering dust. hundreds of thousands have yet to be looked at for the first time. those applications could be the next iphone, inext netbook or the next google. but the agency tasked with reviewing those applications can't keep up so they sit and they sit, often for years. in fact, the average time that it takes a patent to be approved is about 30 months. but when you consider that today technologies often become obsolete within 18 months or less, it is clear that a process that takes two 1/2 years is simply two long and it hurts our competitiveness. those applications at the u.s. patent and trade office, or uspto, represents the great it's the country has to offer in terms of new ideas and new technologies. they contain any number of breakthroughs that help propel our economy out of the recession, expand small business and create new jobs. they could be the key to helping our nation maintain its technological edge globally. patent activi
spend on them, the more we become them. america deserves far better than this. we are better than this. this is the politics of the past. accept. strangely, without even the past, without a real past, they have a made up past but not this past. as i said, the tape of shirley sherrod was in the going to be on my show. i didn't have it scheduled. i want going to play it. when i did, over 24 hours later i supported her. cries of racism now without even an event. so what is this really all about, america? what is the real issue here? because it's not racism. the issue is: choice. as it always is. it's choice. we must choose now. now is the time. do we choose those would create fear? limit choices? lie? cheat? steal? do we stand with acorn, panthers, union thugs? or do we stand with the troops? cops? your church? small business men and women. moms and dads who are just doing their best to make sure their kid has a decent education. parents that fear america's best days are behind her. because the powerful forces of greed and corruption are blocking the road to individual freedom, individua
griffith. georgethomas is on aassignment. evangelical christians in america have become israel staunches ally. that was on full display at the annual christians united for israel summit in washington. erick stakelck has the story. >> reporter: no this isn' jerusalem, tel aviv. the sane of this celebration of israel was the washington convention center. christians united for isrl or cufi has seen their ranks grow including throughout campuses throughout the u.s.>> there is a passion for anyo that believes in the bible. >> he started it in 2006. >> we have received from israel, the word of god, the patriarchsthe prophets of the old testament. we have received mary, joseph, and jesus. >> cufi is the largest the united states. the summit attracted several proisrael lawmakers and tough words for the obama administration from both sides of the aisle regarding israel. >> this administration has become the most antiisrael administration in american history. >> when the administration seized every opportunity to criticize israel for building apartments for its people in the undisputed neighborho
that it is not enough. manufacturing matters. we need to rebuild the manufacturing base of america. we need to make it in america. and we can. i don't think there's a person on this floor that doesn't want to walk into a target store and find made in america labels on everything. we aren't going to get there immediately, but we can get there much, much faster if we pass the correct laws. joining me are several of my colleagues from around the nation who are going to tell their story and what's happening in their community. i would like to start on the far east coast. i'm a west coast person and i'm from california, but there is another side to the continent. they would like to say it's the right side and sometimes they call california the left side. but my colleague from the great state of pennsylvania would like to in form us about what's going on in pennsylvania and more specifically in the philadelphia area. if you would, sir. mr. fattah: i thank our leader on this effort focusing on which matters, manufacturing-based jobs. in philadelphia, we have 1,300 manufacturers and in your package of bill
all across america are swimming to fight cancer. >>> i'll give you an inside look on how this melted chocolate turns into this yummy candy bar. >> and it all starts right now on "teen kids news." ♪ ♪ >>> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm jessica. here's our top story for this week. >>> mention that you have hiv, and you might find that people start avoiding you. that's why the young women you're about to hear from are very brave. felipe tells us why they're sharing their stories. >> hiv, it changed my life overnight. you know, the day before, you know, i was a college student with a social life. just everything seemed so perfect. >> reporter: when marvelyn looks back at her sophomore year of college, the perfect life she knew was shattered when she found out she was hiv positive. >> i had heard about hiv, you know, growing up, but it was something i didn't care about. i didn't feel it was an issue of mine. so when the doctor told me, i didn't cry, i didn't shout, i didn't do anything, i just looked at him. i was more shocked than anything. >> reporter: think ab
, the top secret america -- a new "washington post" investigative series reveals a u.s. national security operation in potential disarray. the papers lead reporter on the story is here. >>> and her identity as a cia operative was leaked sparking an international uproar. valerie plame wilson is weighing in on the hidden culture of spies in the u.s., russia, and iran. we want to welcome our viewers around the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer, you're in "the situation room." >>> just a week ago, few people had heard of shirley sherrod. but the former usda official was thrust into the headlines overnight when conservative web publisher andrew brightbart put out a misleading clip that falsely implied sherrod discriminated against a white farmer. sherrod was forced to resign from the government post. but the video of the entire speech revealed. her words were taken entirely out of context. and her remarks were about overcoming prejudice and discrimination. the agriculture secretary tom vilsack apologized to sherrod and offered her a new job and she spoke by phone with presid
the question for you to open the program. is america exceptional? we have that from one writer from the new yo"new york daily who says it is time to rescue the idea that america is exceptional. what do you think? [phone numbers on the line] host: we have this piece on this fourth of july titled "bring back the old glory." he says the notion of american exceptionalism that it is a unique nation on earth if not in all history is in decline among much of the country's self-appointed chattering classes. they write the lion's share of books, magazines, editorials and blogs. that leads to the idea that america itself is in decline. it is a dangerous notion writes the author. not just on our 234th birthday but the long-term health and strength of the republic. we must rescue american exceptionalism to preserve the bright future we deserve. the idea we have a special place on the planet dates back to the book "democracy in america" and the position of the americans is quite exceptional he wrote in 1831 and may be believed that no democratic people will ever be placed in a similar one. the words of ale
citizens here without a judge. here's the problem, america. the policy doesn't match the rhetoric. there is something, however, there is something that does match the policies of this administration. we have been comparing them this week. tonight, the third and final installment of the manifesto. sit how radicals think. you are going to learn even more tonight. it unfortunately may be the story of america. any progressive, anybody at media matters? or anything fun about george soros and i think everyone abouts him is fun now, they say they are afraid of me because i am a guy with a blackboard. no, no, i got three tonight. freak out. the goal of the weather underground, this is their manifesto written in 1969, the goal was a dictatorship of a new democracy that developed into socialism. okay? this is, lets me move this over here. end capitalism and imperialism in the united states and replace it with a new democracy with a dictator and global socialism. now, let's focus for a minute on what dictatorship really is. a dictatorship according to the dictionary i have but that could be
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 4,224 (some duplicates have been removed)